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Ian Regan

Ian Regan

Ian Regan hails from Plymouth, Great Britain. He has a long-time passion for astronomy, particularly for the Apollo Lunar Program and unmanned exploration of the outer planets. His biggest astronomical inspiration is the late British popularizer and TV presenter, Sir Patrick Moore. A contributor to the Apollo Lunar Surface Journal, he is also an image-processor for the forthcoming big-screen film "In Saturn's Rings."

Check out Ian's work at his Flickr and YouTube accounts:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/10795027@N08/

https://www.youtube.com/user/planetaryprobes

Latest Blog Posts

Saturn in Widescreen: The Voyager 2 Approach Movie

Posted 2015/07/07 09:18 CDT | 1 comment

Ian Regan shares his mesmerizing animated sequence of Voyager 2's approach to Saturn—and explains the process behind its creation.

Another Pale Blue Dot — Uranus Spied By Cassini

Posted 2014/04/30 06:53 CDT | 1 comment

The Cassini mission has already returned an array of images of other solar system members from Saturn orbit: Earth (and the Moon), Venus, Mars, and Jupiter. It’s time to add another world to that list!

Older blog posts »

Latest Processed Space Images

Titan's northern lakes, July 16, 2016

Titan's northern lakes, July 16, 2016

Posted 2016/09/12 | 0 comments

A portrait of Titan using images taken through several infrared filters processed into "pseudocolor" reveals its northern lakes region receiving summer sun. To the south of the lakes, near the bottom of the disk, is the Belet sand dune region.

Titan's northern lakes, August 3, 2016

Titan's northern lakes, August 3, 2016

Posted 2016/09/12 | 0 comments

A portrait of Titan using images taken through several infrared filters (left) processed into "pseudocolor" (right) reveals its northern lakes region receiving summer sun. Kraken Mare, on the south, has crisper edges; Ligeia Mare, to the upper right, has fuzzier edges. To the south of the lakes, near the bottom of the disk, are the Senkyo and Belet sand dune regions.

Crisp views of Titan's northern lakes and equatorial dunefields

Crisp views of Titan's northern lakes and equatorial dunefields

Posted 2016/09/12 | 0 comments

A near-global view of Titan shows its surface from the north polar lakes to the equatorial dune fields of Fensal-Aztlan and Senkyo. The center image shows Titan approximately as it would appear to the human eye, its surface hidden by haze and its north pole experiencing a summer "hood". On the right, surface details are revealed by looking at Titan in an infrared wavelength ("CB3") at which methane is relatively transparent, and correcting for the affect of the methane in the atmosphere by dividing that image by one taken in a wavelength where methane absorbs light. On the left, the enhanced surface image has been colorized using data from methane filters in a way that mimics the natural color of Titan.

More pictures processed by Ian Regan »

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