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Ian Regan

Ian Regan

Ian Regan hails from Plymouth, Great Britain. He has a long-time passion for astronomy, particularly for the Apollo Lunar Program and unmanned exploration of the outer planets. His biggest astronomical inspiration is the late British popularizer and TV presenter, Sir Patrick Moore. A contributor to the Apollo Lunar Surface Journal, he is also an image-processor for the forthcoming big-screen film "In Saturn's Rings."

Check out Ian's work at his Flickr and YouTube accounts:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/10795027@N08/

https://www.youtube.com/user/planetaryprobes

Latest Blog Posts

Saturn in Widescreen: The Voyager 2 Approach Movie

Posted 2015/07/07 09:18 CDT | 1 comment

Ian Regan shares his mesmerizing animated sequence of Voyager 2's approach to Saturn—and explains the process behind its creation.

Another Pale Blue Dot — Uranus Spied By Cassini

Posted 2014/04/30 06:53 CDT | 1 comment

The Cassini mission has already returned an array of images of other solar system members from Saturn orbit: Earth (and the Moon), Venus, Mars, and Jupiter. It’s time to add another world to that list!

Older blog posts »

Latest Processed Space Images

Jupiter Rotation Movie Taken by Voyager 1 (Reprocessed)

Jupiter Rotation Movie Taken by Voyager 1 (Reprocessed)

Posted 2015/08/23 | 0 comments

Ian Regan created this Jupiter rotation movie using images taken by Voyager 1 as it approached the planet in 1979, over a period of approximately 15 hours. Ian reprocessed the images and used VirtualDub / AVISynth frame stabilization filters for the animation. The original approach movie can be viewed here for comparison.

Jupiter Rotation Movie Taken by Voyager 1

Jupiter Rotation Movie Taken by Voyager 1

Posted 2015/08/23 | 0 comments

This Jupiter rotation movie was created using images taken by Voyager 1 as it approached the planet in 1979, over a period of approximately 15 hours. This equates to one and a half Jovian days.

Earth and Moon from DSCOVR

Earth and Moon from DSCOVR

Posted 2015/08/05 | 0 comments

NASA's Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC) aboard the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) satellite captured this unique view of the Moon as it moved in front of the sunlit side of Earth last month. This view shows the fully illuminated “dark side” of the moon that is never visible from Earth. Ian Regan processed this version of the image to account for the Moon's motion.

More pictures processed by Ian Regan »

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