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Bjorn Jonsson

Björn Jónsson

Björn Jónsson (Iceland) is the developer of the IMG2PNG software, which batch-converts spacecraft image data to PNG format.  His website contains simulated views of other planets produced using image maps generated from space image data; most of his image processing work is posted only within unmannespaceflight.com or on this website. (UMSF Moderator: Bjorn Jonsson)

Unless otherwise specified, the work of Jonsson is shared on planetary.org under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
Contact us to request publication permission.

Latest Blog Posts

A deep dive into the highest-resolution Voyager Jupiter data

Posted 2016/09/14 08:00 CDT | 0 comment

A few weeks before the first Juno high resolution imaging, I decided to take a look at Voyager color images at various resolutions, with particular attention to high-resolution mosaics.

Jupiter's Great Red Spot

Posted 2015/12/07 06:59 CST | 1 comment

On the 20th anniversary of Galileo's orbit insertion around Jupiter, amateur image processor Björn Jónsson shares some of the mission's first images of Jupiter's iconic massive storm.

Mapping Europa

Posted 2015/02/18 01:38 CST | 2 comments

Several global maps have been made of Europa, but amateur image processor Björn Jónsson felt they could be improved—so he decided to make a new one.

Older blog posts »

Latest Processed Space Images

White Oval DE, Jupiter

White Oval DE, Jupiter

Posted 2016/09/15 | 0 comments

About 10 hours before closest approach to Jupiter, Voyager 1 acquired three 1x3 narrow angle green filtered mosaics of one of the three big, white ovals that were present in the South Temperate Zone at latitude 33°S during the Voyager flybys. These ovals formed in 1939–1941 and had been shrinking since then. They were named oval BC, oval DE and oval FA. In 1998, ovals DE and BC merged into a single oval that was named oval BE. In 2000, oval BE absorbed oval FA to form what was named oval BA. In 2006, the color of oval BA changed from white to red, similar to the Great Red Spot. It still has a strong, orange color. This mosaic shows white oval DE. This oval is visible at lower right in this global mosaic of Jupiter. The images in this mosaic were acquired at a distance of ~800,000 km from Jupiter's center at a resolution of ~8 km/pixel. Color, contrast, and sharpness have been enhanced to better show various details.

Limb of Jupiter from Voyager 2

Limb of Jupiter from Voyager 2

Posted 2016/09/14 | 0 comments

This Voyager 2 mosaic shows Jupiter's limb. The images comprising the mosaic were acquired at a distance of ~745,000 km from Jupiter's center at a resolution of ~7 km/pixel. Color, contrast, and sharpness have been enhanced to better show various details.

Jupiter's North Equatorial Belt and North Tropical Zone

Jupiter's North Equatorial Belt and North Tropical Zone

Posted 2016/09/14 | 0 comments

This is a nine frame Voyager 1 mosaic focusing primarily on Jupiter's North Equatorial Belt (NEB), the North Tropical Zone (NTrZ) and their turbulent boundary. A jet stream is visible in central NTrZ, and examples of the NEB plumes are also visible. Gravity waves can be seen below and to the right of center. The images in this mosaic were acquired from a range of ~2.4 million kilometers from Jupiter's center at a resolution of ~24 km/pixel. Color, contrast, and sharpness have been enhanced to better show various details.

More pictures processed by Björn Jónsson »

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