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Ted Stryk over Europa

Ted Stryk

I am a philosophy professor at Roane State Community College in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Planetary exploration has always been an interest of mine. You can follow me on twitter @tedstryk for the latest updates on my work, which I often post on my blog, Planetary Images from Then and Now. Please note that since the processed images are copyrighted, they should not be reused without permission. If you are interested in using any of my work, please contact me at strykt@roanestate.edu or tedstryk@gmail.com.

Unless otherwise specified, the work of Stryk is shared on planetary.org under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License.
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Latest Blog Posts

New Horizons: Updates From the January 2014 Science Team Meeting, Part 2

Posted 2014/01/24 01:16 CST | 3 comments

Ted Stryk reports on the status of the New Horizons mission from the mission's latest Science Team Meeting. Updates include the status of the Kuiper Belt target search and the use of ALMA to refine Pluto's ephemeris.

New Horizons: Updates From the Science Team Meeting, Part 1

Posted 2014/01/23 06:15 CST | 1 comment

Ted Stryk reports on the status of the New Horizons mission from the mission's latest Science Team Meeting.

Jupiter and Io from Pioneer 10

Posted 2013/08/02 04:25 CDT | 2 comments

This is a parting shot of Jupiter and Io, taken December 5, 1973, by the Pioneer 10 spacecraft, the first to see either world as a crescent.

Older blog posts »

Latest Processed Space Images

Vesta on June 20, 2011

Vesta on June 20, 2011

Posted 2013/10/29 | 0 comments

To make this image, Ted Stryk stacked four frames of the Vesta animation taken by Dawn on June 20, 2011.

Galileo's best image of Jupiter's moon Adrastea

Galileo's best image of Jupiter's moon Adrastea

Posted 2013/10/17 | 0 comments

This is Galileo's only photo of Adrastea. It was taken on December 19, 1996 from a distance of about 658,100 kilometers.

All images of Jupiter's moon Metis from Galileo

All images of Jupiter's moon Metis from Galileo

Posted 2013/10/17 | 0 comments

Located deep within Jupiter's radiation belts, Metis and its neighbor Adrastea can only be seen distantly from spacecraft. These are all of the views of Metis that Galileo obtained. Metis is about 40 kilometers in diameter.

More pictures processed by Ted Stryk »

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