Join Donate

Phil Stooke

Phil Stooke

Phil Stooke

Latest Blog Posts

Finding spacecraft impacts on the Moon

February 20, 2017

Over nearly 60 years of spacecraft exploration of the Moon, lots of spacecraft have crashed on the lunar surface—some accidental, some intentional. Phil Stooke hunts for their impact sites.

Lunar Farside Landing Plans

May 27, 2016

Phil Stooke describes a research trip to the Regional Planetary Image Facility at the USGS in Flagstaff, where he discovered Jack Schmitt's proposed plans for a farside landing site for Apollo 17.

Finding the Surveyor retro-rockets on the Moon

September 15, 2015

Planetary scientist Phil Stooke may have found the retro-rockets from NASA's Lunar Surveyor missions, sent to the Moon in preparation for Apollo.

Latest Processed Space Images

Approaching Lutetia

February 09, 2014

Fifteen of the photos taken by Rosetta as it approached Lutetia. This montage was composed by Phil Stooke after a version released by the OSIRIS team; Stooke adjusted the contrast to bring out more detail in the brightly sunlit areas, and oriented the images so that north is approximately up. The second image in the sequence (one up from lower left corner) is approximately the same view as the final image, so the frames shown cover a full rotation of Lutetia.

A world of dunes and rock

January 01, 2014

On Sol 2,034, Opportunity had driven to a relatively bedrock-rich spot among the Meridiani dunes. A meteorite named Mackinac, the third it had investigated in recent weeks, sits at about the 7:00 position, close to the rover. The image is a polar projection of a 360-degree Navcam panorama captured by Opportunity after a 60-plus-meter drive to the northwest. The direction of the drive was almost directly away from Opportunity's eventual goal of Endeavour crater, but it placed Opportunity on a large area of bedrock that continues for some distance to the south, Opportunity's likely next driving direction.

Methone

May 21, 2012

Methone is a small (3-kilometer) moon of Saturn that orbits between Mimas and Enceladus near Anthe and Pallene. Cassini captured high-resolution views of it on May 20, 2012.

astronaut on Phobos
Let's Change the World

Become a member of The Planetary Society and together we will create the future of space exploration.

Join Today

Mars
Advocacy

Our Advocacy Program provides each Society member a voice in the process. Funding is crucial.

Donate

You are here: