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More Issues

Feature: Exoplanets

2 March 2020

Your Guide to Exoplanets

Learn why and how we study exoplanets, and how you can get involved.

2 March 2020

Our Exoplanets Research

Scientists are searching for 100 Earth-like planets around other stars, and you can help.

Swapna Krishna ● 12 March 2020

What is the Habitable Zone?

The habitable zone is the not-too-hot, not-too-cold region around a star where liquid water can exist.

Emily Lakdawalla ● 2 March 2020

The Different Kinds of Exoplanets
You Meet in the Milky Way

Lava worlds. Hot Jupiters. Earth 2.0 candidates. Here's a rundown of some notable exoplanets.

Emily Lakdawalla & Staff ● 2 March 2020

How to Search for Exoplanets

Some methods almost sound like science fiction: Using gravity as a magnifying glass, watching stars wobble at turtle-like speeds, and searching for tiny dips in starlight.

2 March 2020

Your guide to WFIRST

WFIRST, NASA's Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope, is the next step in our hunt for Earth-sized exoplanets.

Blogs & Articles

What changed with space directive #1?

Casey Dreier • December 30, 2017 • 4

President Trump signed Space Directive #1, formally implementing as policy what Vice President Pence had announced at the first meeting of the National Space Council in October: that NASA will focus its human spaceflight efforts on a return to the Moon, and then onto Mars. What really changed?

Mastcam-Z team blog: Landing sites

Katherine Winchell and Elsa Jensen • December 28, 2017 • 7

It takes years to decide where a Mars rover is going to land. Members of NASA's Mars 2020's camera team describe their participation in the process.

What's Up in Solar System Exploration in 2018

Emily Lakdawalla • December 27, 2017 • 4

Three launches to the Moon and one each to Mercury and Mars; two arrivals at near-Earth asteroids; and an approach to an encounter with a distant Kuiper belt object are highlights we anticipate in 2018.

Pretty Pictures of the Cosmos: Snapshots of Chaos

Adam Block • December 26, 2017

Award-winning astrophotographer Adam Block brings us stunning images of beautifully chaotic scenes across the universe.

These are a few of our favorite things: Top 2017 planetary stories

Emily Lakdawalla • December 22, 2017

Looking back on 2017, we here at The Planetary Society are proud of what we have accomplished during this orbit of the Sun. Emily Lakdawalla, Jason Davis, Casey Dreier, and Mat Kaplan reflect on the year that was.

Visualize today's solstice with images from Earth-observing satellites

Jason Davis • December 21, 2017

What do the shortest days of the year look like from space?

Downselect: NASA narrows future mission destination to comet 67P or Titan

Jason Davis • December 20, 2017 • 7

The winner will be picked in 2019.

#AGU17: Spherical harmonics, gravity, and the depth of winds at Jupiter

Emily Lakdawalla • December 20, 2017 • 3

Results from the Juno gravity science experiment presented at last week's American Geophysical Union meeting suggest Jupiter's winds penetrate only to 3000 kilometers deep.

A closer look at China's audacious Mars sample return plans

Andrew Jones • December 19, 2017 • 3

China is making steady progress on a proposed mission to bring a piece of Mars back to Earth in the late 2020s.

#AGU17: JunoCam science

Emily Lakdawalla • December 18, 2017 • 2

JunoCam may be an outreach instrument, but its superb photos of storms on Jupiter are providing plenty of data for scientists to talk about.

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