Join Donate

Blogs

Author

All

Date

All

Keyword

All

The Curiosity Kerfuffle: the big (and increasing) difference between data and discovery

Emily Lakdawalla • December 03, 2012 • 17

I'm in San Francisco, reporting from the American Geophysical Union meeting. This morning, there was a much-anticipated press briefing featuring the latest results from Curiosity.

Field Report From Mars: Sol 3150 - December 3, 2012

Larry Crumpler • December 03, 2012

Here at station 14 we have decided to do a detailed investigation of an outcrop that is well exposed and lies within an area where there is orbital remote-sensing evidence for clay minerals. These particular rocks are interesting in that they contain a lot of thin veins and alteration zones along joints (cracks) in the outcrops.

OSIRIS-REx "Name That Asteroid!" Contest Deadline Extended to December 31

Emily Lakdawalla • November 30, 2012

Good news, everyone! The OSIRIS-REx team wants to give as many kids as possible a chance to Name That Asteroid! The contest entry deadline has been extended to December 31.

More than you probably wanted to know about Curiosity's SAM instrument

Emily Lakdawalla • November 30, 2012 • 26

With all the hoopla surrounding the unknown results of the first analysis of a soil sample by Curiosity's Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument, I thought an explainer would be useful. What is SAM, what is it designed to measure, and what is the nature of its results? Here you go.

SMBC on NASA announcements

Emily Lakdawalla • November 29, 2012

Zach Weiner of Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal critiques NASA's announcement style.

Water ice and organics at Mercury's poles

Emily Lakdawalla • November 29, 2012 • 9

Water ice at Mercury's poles? That's crazy, right? The MESSENGER team has made a very good case that radar-bright material seen by the Arecibo telescope is, in fact, water ice, covered in most places by a veneer of dark organic material.

Images from the long-awaited Dawn Vesta data set

Daniel Macháček • November 29, 2012 • 4

A few days ago, the Dawn mission finally published their archival data. During the year of delay I often looked with anticipation to the Planetary Data System to check whether or not images were there, and I am delighted that they are finally available. Was the wait worth it? Definitely!

That amazing image of Saturn's north pole just got better: now, it moves!

Emily Lakdawalla • November 28, 2012 • 2

Remember the amazing photo of Saturn's north pole that I posted yesterday? Now, thanks to an amateur image processor, it moves, and the motions of the individual clouds within the belts are mesmerizing.

The Planetary Society at AGU 2012

Casey Dreier • November 28, 2012

Emily Lakdawalla and Casey Dreier will both attend this year's AGU conference in San Francisco as representatives of the Planetary Society.

Staring into Saturn's baleful eye

Emily Lakdawalla • November 27, 2012 • 12

Amazing photos have just come back from Cassini, of swirling clouds surrounding Saturn's north pole.

Items 31 - 40 of 464  Previous12345678910Next
Bill Nye and people
Let's Change the World

Become a member of The Planetary Society and together we will create the future of space exploration.

Join Today

Europa
The Planetary Fund

Help advance robotic and human space exploration, defend our planet, and search for life.

Donate

You are here: