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More Issues

Feature: Exoplanets

2 March 2020

Your Guide to Exoplanets

Learn why and how we study exoplanets, and how you can get involved.

2 March 2020

Our Exoplanets Research

Scientists are searching for 100 Earth-like planets around other stars, and you can help.

Swapna Krishna ● 12 March 2020

What is the Habitable Zone?

The habitable zone is the not-too-hot, not-too-cold region around a star where liquid water can exist.

Emily Lakdawalla ● 2 March 2020

The Different Kinds of Exoplanets
You Meet in the Milky Way

Lava worlds. Hot Jupiters. Earth 2.0 candidates. Here's a rundown of some notable exoplanets.

Emily Lakdawalla & Staff ● 2 March 2020

How to Search for Exoplanets

Some methods almost sound like science fiction: Using gravity as a magnifying glass, watching stars wobble at turtle-like speeds, and searching for tiny dips in starlight.

2 March 2020

Your guide to WFIRST

WFIRST, NASA's Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope, is the next step in our hunt for Earth-sized exoplanets.

Blogs & Articles

Copenhagen Needs More Space - Space Science Has Critical Role to Play in Climate Science

Charlene Anderson • December 10, 2009

Climate change and Copenhagen are dominating the world news this week, as politicians, diplomats, scientists, and protesters gathered in the Danish city for the 2009 meeting for the U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change.

The Norway Spiral

Emily Lakdawalla • December 10, 2009

I had a fun conversation with Paul Harris just now on his show at KTRS about the crazy spiral that showed up in Norwegian skies yesterday.

Planetary Society Advent Calendar for December 10: Triton

Emily Lakdawalla • December 10, 2009

Welcome to the tenth post in my "Advent Calendar" -- I am opening a door each day on a different world in the solar system, and I'll be continuing to do so until New Year's Day.

Planetary Society Advent Calendar for December 9: Atlas

Emily Lakdawalla • December 09, 2009

Here's another weird-looking one, though it's less weird from this particular, polar point of view than it is when viewed from the side.

Send Your Name to Venus, now with a certificate!

Emily Lakdawalla • December 09, 2009

I wrote a few weeks ago about a new Send Your Name to Venus campaign conducted by the Akatsuki mission. Now The Planetary Society has arranged with JAXA to collect names and messages on our website.

Planetary Society Advent Calendar for December 8: Itokawa

Emily Lakdawalla • December 08, 2009

I love this asteroid. It's just so weird-looking.

Carnival of Space and Planetary Radio

Emily Lakdawalla • December 08, 2009

This week's Carnival of Space may be found at Steve's Astro Corner.

Planetary Society Advent Calendar for December 7: Jupiter

Emily Lakdawalla • December 07, 2009

Jupiter has been high overhead at sunset for several months, a brilliant light that's easy to spot even when the sky is still bright at dusk; but it's now moving quickly to the west as Earth speeds ahead of Jupiter's more stately march around the Sun.

Four hundred and fourteen years since Galileo

Emily Lakdawalla • December 07, 2009

Galileo, the scientist, discovered the Galilean satellites of Jupiter four hundred years ago next month, while Galileo, the mission, arrived at Jupiter to study those moons in situ fourteen years ago Sunday.

Planetary Society Advent Calendar for December 6: Umbriel

Emily Lakdawalla • December 06, 2009

Umbriel is the darkest moon in a pretty dark place in the solar system, the Uranus system.

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