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Mapping Mars, now and in history

Emily Lakdawalla • February 26, 2009

Planetary cartographer Phil Stooke has been working on a cool project to compose and compare maps of Mars that show how we saw the planet throughout the Space Age.

Treasures from Mars' ancient history

Emily Lakdawalla • January 28, 2009

In which I discover Earl Slipher's Mars: The Photographic Story.

OPAG, Day 2: Ground-based study of the small bodies in the outer solar system

Emily Lakdawalla • May 07, 2006

After the political discussions of the morning, Mike Brown stood up to give the "highly subjective view of one ground-based astronomer," he said.

Modest scopes could help with the Hyperion observations

Emily Lakdawalla • September 22, 2005

I got an email last night from Anne Verbiscer, whom I had contacted about rounding up some amateur astronomers to help the Cassini mission with some photometric observations of Hyperion.

DPS: Updates on 2003 EL61 and 2005 FY9

Emily Lakdawalla • September 13, 2005

At a press briefing, the co-discoverers of the so-called "10th planet" 2003 UB313 gave an update on what is known about this and the other two scattered Kuiper Belt bodies that were announced at the time: 2003 EL61 and 2005 FY9.

DPS: Central transit of Earth as seen from Saturn

Emily Lakdawalla • September 13, 2005

There were a few talks at the Division of Planetary Sciences meeting dealing with a rare and fortuitous event that happened on January 13, 2005.

No Longer Boring: 'Fireworks' and Other Surprises at Uranus Spotted Through Adaptive Optics

Emily Lakdawalla • November 11, 2004

Uranus has the unfortunate reputation of being the most boring planet in the solar system. But where it appeared to be a nearly featureless, hazy blue ball to Voyager 2, it is now blooming dozens of clouds that are visible to the sharp-eyed Keck II Telescope.

Close Your Left Eye, Then Your Right: Simultaneous Observations of Asteroid 4179 Toutatis from Two Chilean Telescopes Demonstrate Parallax

Emily Lakdawalla • September 29, 2004

This morning, asteroid 4179 Toutatis was so close to Earth that simultaneous observations from two telescopes in the same country could show parallax that is obvious even to the least experienced observer. The two telescopes belong to The European Southern Observatory and are located at La Silla and Paranal in Chile

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