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More Issues

Feature: Exoplanets

2 March 2020

Your Guide to Exoplanets

Learn why and how we study exoplanets, and how you can get involved.

2 March 2020

Our Exoplanets Research

Scientists are searching for 100 Earth-like planets around other stars, and you can help.

Swapna Krishna ● 12 March 2020

What is the Habitable Zone?

The habitable zone is the not-too-hot, not-too-cold region around a star where liquid water can exist.

Emily Lakdawalla ● 2 March 2020

The Different Kinds of Exoplanets
You Meet in the Milky Way

Lava worlds. Hot Jupiters. Earth 2.0 candidates. Here's a rundown of some notable exoplanets.

Emily Lakdawalla & Staff ● 2 March 2020

How to Search for Exoplanets

Some methods almost sound like science fiction: Using gravity as a magnifying glass, watching stars wobble at turtle-like speeds, and searching for tiny dips in starlight.

2 March 2020

Your guide to WFIRST

WFIRST, NASA's Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope, is the next step in our hunt for Earth-sized exoplanets.

Blogs & Articles

Mountain range on Titan

Emily Lakdawalla • December 26, 2006

A couple of weeks ago there were press releases coming out of the American Geophysical Union meeting about the discovery of a "massive mountain range" on Titan.

CIRS gets another view of Enceladus' south polar hot spot

Emily Lakdawalla • December 22, 2006

There's a new image product released from the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) on Cassini, an instrument that is capable of measuring the temperatures on the extremely cold surfaces of Saturn's moons and rings.

Saturn from above (2006)

Emily Lakdawalla • December 19, 2006

Ever since I first read about the plans for Cassini's tour of the Saturn system I've been looking forward to the current phase of the mission.

Breaking a tie on the Cassini science teams

Emily Lakdawalla • December 15, 2006

This week's Cassini Project Update was particularly interesting, because it contained a story about how a difficult decision was made regarding the prioritizing of different science teams' desires for an upcoming Titan flyby.

Cassini VIMS and RADAR: a cryovolcano on Titan?

Emily Lakdawalla • December 13, 2006

Yesterday, the VIMS team released several images from Cassini's "T20" flyby of Titan, which took place on October 20.

Mars Odyssey is in safe mode

Emily Lakdawalla • December 07, 2006

According to an update posted on the Athena website by Steve Squyres this morning, the Mars Odyssey orbiter has gone in to safe mode.

New Horizons spots Pluto!

Emily Lakdawalla • November 29, 2006

Yesterday the New Horizons team released a flicker animation showing the spacecraft's first sight of Pluto, using the LORRI long-range imaging instrument.

New names for Enceladus' features

Emily Lakdawalla • November 15, 2006

The IAU has just approved new names for 35 craters, dorsa, fossae, and sulci on the surface of Enceladus, based upon Cassini's high-resolution mapping of the little moon. What are dorsa, fossae, and sulci, you might ask?

Still no word from Mars Global Surveyor

Emily Lakdawalla • November 14, 2006

It's now been nine days since Mars Global Surveyor was last heard from.

A few words from John Spencer on the OPAG meeting

Emily Lakdawalla • November 10, 2006

John Spencer, erstwhile guest blogger (see here and here), just sent me a few notes on the recent Outer Planets Assessment Group meeting.

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