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More Issues

Feature: Exoplanets

2 March 2020

Your Guide to Exoplanets

Learn why and how we study exoplanets, and how you can get involved.

2 March 2020

Our Exoplanets Research

Scientists are searching for 100 Earth-like planets around other stars, and you can help.

Swapna Krishna ● 12 March 2020

What is the Habitable Zone?

The habitable zone is the not-too-hot, not-too-cold region around a star where liquid water can exist.

Emily Lakdawalla ● 2 March 2020

The Different Kinds of Exoplanets
You Meet in the Milky Way

Lava worlds. Hot Jupiters. Earth 2.0 candidates. Here's a rundown of some notable exoplanets.

Emily Lakdawalla & Staff ● 2 March 2020

How to Search for Exoplanets

Some methods almost sound like science fiction: Using gravity as a magnifying glass, watching stars wobble at turtle-like speeds, and searching for tiny dips in starlight.

2 March 2020

Your guide to WFIRST

WFIRST, NASA's Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope, is the next step in our hunt for Earth-sized exoplanets.

Blogs & Articles

Planetary Society Advent Calendar for December 31: Uranus

Emily Lakdawalla • December 31, 2009

Did you think I was going to skip Uranus? How could I?

Planetary Society Advent Calendar for December 28: Ariel

Emily Lakdawalla • December 28, 2009

Here's yet another of the moons of Uranus for you: Ariel, a near-twin in diameter to Umbriel, but apparently with more interesting geology.

Planetary Society Advent Calendar for December 21: Miranda

Emily Lakdawalla • December 21, 2009

Miranda is the one moon of Uranus for which we have very good images from Voyager 2, and that was a stroke of luck, because low-resolution shots of all of Uranus' moons would have told us that it was, geologically speaking, the most dramatic of the five biggest ones.

Planetary Society Advent Calendar for December 18: Neptune

Emily Lakdawalla • December 18, 2009

Here's Neptune, but not quite like you've ever seen it before.

Planetary Society Advent Calendar for December 17: Proteus

Emily Lakdawalla • December 17, 2009

Proteus is a weird name for this world. It's the second-largest moon of Neptune, and so it's named (as are all of Neptune's moons) for deities associated with the sea.

Planetary Society Advent Calendar for December 10: Triton

Emily Lakdawalla • December 10, 2009

Welcome to the tenth post in my "Advent Calendar" -- I am opening a door each day on a different world in the solar system, and I'll be continuing to do so until New Year's Day.

Planetary Society Advent Calendar for December 7: Jupiter

Emily Lakdawalla • December 07, 2009

Jupiter has been high overhead at sunset for several months, a brilliant light that's easy to spot even when the sky is still bright at dusk; but it's now moving quickly to the west as Earth speeds ahead of Jupiter's more stately march around the Sun.

Planetary Society Advent Calendar for December 6: Umbriel

Emily Lakdawalla • December 06, 2009

Umbriel is the darkest moon in a pretty dark place in the solar system, the Uranus system.

What do we know about Uranus' moons? Part 2

Emily Lakdawalla • February 19, 2009

Here is every single image of the last two moons discovered prior to the Voyager 2 encounter, Titania and Umbriel.

What do we know about Uranus' moons? Part 1

Emily Lakdawalla • January 20, 2009 • 2

I got an urge to dive in to the Voyager image archives and see what exactly we have here on Earth to base our understanding of the Uranian moons on.

Bill Nye and people
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