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More Issues

Feature: Exoplanets

2 March 2020

Your Guide to Exoplanets

Learn why and how we study exoplanets, and how you can get involved.

2 March 2020

Our Exoplanets Research

Scientists are searching for 100 Earth-like planets around other stars, and you can help.

Swapna Krishna ● 12 March 2020

What is the Habitable Zone?

The habitable zone is the not-too-hot, not-too-cold region around a star where liquid water can exist.

Emily Lakdawalla ● 2 March 2020

The Different Kinds of Exoplanets
You Meet in the Milky Way

Lava worlds. Hot Jupiters. Earth 2.0 candidates. Here's a rundown of some notable exoplanets.

Emily Lakdawalla & Staff ● 2 March 2020

How to Search for Exoplanets

Some methods almost sound like science fiction: Using gravity as a magnifying glass, watching stars wobble at turtle-like speeds, and searching for tiny dips in starlight.

2 March 2020

Your guide to WFIRST

WFIRST, NASA's Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope, is the next step in our hunt for Earth-sized exoplanets.

Blogs & Articles

Planetary discovery over the past quarter century

Steven Hauck • December 20, 2016 • 1

2016 marks the 25th anniversary of the creation of what has become one of the primary venues for the publication of research in planetary science: the Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets. This occasion is a good opportunity to look back at what we have learned in this era of expanded exploration and to try to take a peek at the future.

New Gems from the Moon

Bill Dunford • October 10, 2016 • 3

More than seven years after the end of its mission, JAXA has released the entire data set from Kaguya's HDTV cameras.

Video: Two talks featuring pretty pictures from space

Emily Lakdawalla • June 10, 2016 • 1

Videos of two recent talks I've given, one intended for a general audience and one aimed at professionals.

Akatsuki begins a productive science mission at Venus

Emily Lakdawalla • May 19, 2016 • 4

Japan's Akatsuki Venus orbiter is well into its science mission, and has already produced surprising science results. The mission, originally planned to last two years, could last as many as five, monitoring Venus' atmosphere over the long term.

Atmospheric Waves Awareness: An Explainer

Anna Scott • April 20, 2016 • 4

There are two types of atmospheric waves that are critically important on Earth and other planets: gravity waves and planetary waves.

Bill Nye and people
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