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Displaying results 91 - 95 of 95 items found.

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91. #DPS17: Wobbling the Moon and art by James Tuttle Keane

(Web Page; Tue Oct 24 12:41:00 CDT 2017)

James Tuttle Keane is increasingly famous (among planetary scientists anyway) for his remarkable illustrated notes from conferences. I'll post those at the end, but first I'll focus on Keane's own scientific work as illustrated by him an...

Description: James Tuttle Keane is increasingly famous (among planetary scientists anyway) for his remarkable illustrated notes from conferences. Here's his work from the Division for Planetary Sciences meeting, illustrating both his own and others' research.

92. Inspect keywords on blog entries

(Web Page; Mon Aug 19 15:20:00 CDT 2013)

100 !-TYPES OF STORIES- 101 best of 111 mission status 111 pretty pictures 121 citizen science 121 explaining image processing 121 explaining science 121 explaining technology 121 history 131 events and announcements 131 podcasts and vid...

93. LADEE prelaunch facts

(Web Page; Thu Sep 05 19:21:00 CDT 2013)

Are you ready for LADEE to launch tomorrow? Launch is scheduled for September 6, 2013 at 8:27 p.m. PDT (September 7 at 03:27 UTC).Tomorrow morning, I will be on National Public Radio's On Point at about 8:45 a.m. PDT / 15:45 UT, talking ...

Description: I glean all the important facts about NASA's next Moon mission from their prelaunch press kit. Launch is scheduled for September 6, 2013 at 8:27 p.m. PDT (September 7 at 03:27 UTC).

94. Detecting Spacetime Distortions

(Web Page; Tue Mar 25 08:16:00 CDT 2014)

It’s rare that a new discovery can stop an astrophysicist in their tracks and leave them lost for words. We’re used to media hype around results that are not really all that big a deal, and usually, by the time something hits...

Description: Katie Mack explains why the BICEP2 detection of primordial gravitational waves has left astrophysicists at a loss for words.

95. Growth. Peak. Collapse. Planetary exploration from 1959 - 1989

(Web Page; Tue Sep 09 01:50:00 CDT 2014)

In prior posts, I have discussed NASA’s place within the federal budget, and the space science budget within NASA. In this post, I want to look at the role of planetary science at NASA, and what we get for varying levels of investm...

Description: The first three decades of planetary exploration tell a story that sounds all-too-familiar to modern day space advocates. Growth, peak, and then collapse of hard-earned capability. This is the story of planetary science for the first half of its existence.

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