Join Donate

Search Results


Displaying results 1 - 10 of 95 items found.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next

1. Liftoff for GRAIL!

(Web Page; Thu Jan 10 17:48:00 CST 2019)

Description: Liftoff for the GRAIL mission to the Moon at 13:08UTC on September 10, 2011! From @carlmilner

2. GRAIL

(Web Page; Thu Jan 10 17:48:00 CST 2019)

3. GRAIL's map of the lunar Bouguer gravity anomaly

(Web Page; Thu Jan 10 17:40:00 CST 2019)

Description: These maps of the moon show the "Bouguer" gravity anomalies as measured by NASA's GRAIL mission. Bouguer gravity is what remains from the gravity field when the attraction of surface topography is removed, and therefore represents mass anomalies inside the moon due to either variations in crustal thickness or variations in crust or mantle density. Red areas have stronger gravity, while blue areas have weaker gravity.

4. GRAIL

(Web Page; Thu Jan 10 17:48:00 CST 2019)

5. GRAIL spacecraft separation

(Web Page; Mon Sep 25 16:43:00 CDT 2017)

Description: NASA's Twin GRAIL spacecraft head for their lunar mission aboard a Delta II rocket at 13:08:52.775 UTC on September 10, 2011.

6. GRAIL A separates from its second stage rocket

(Web Page; Thu Jan 10 17:40:00 CST 2019)

7. Isostasy, gravity, and the Moon: an explainer of the first results of the GRAIL mission

(Web Page; Sun Apr 05 20:29:00 CDT 2015)

Last week the GRAIL lunar gravity mission published their first scientific results, and what they have found will send many geophysicists back to the drawing board to explain how the Moon formed and why it looks the way it does now. To e...

Description: Last week the GRAIL mission published their first scientific results, and what they have found will send many geophysicists back to the drawing board to explain how the Moon formed and why it looks the way it does now. To explain how, I'm going to have to back way up, and explain the basic science behind gravity data.

8. How GRAIL will meet its end

(Web Page; Sun Apr 05 20:36:00 CDT 2015)

The twin GRAIL spacecraft are nearly out of fuel, and are being directed to a controlled impact near the north pole on the near side of the Moon on December 17. Ending the mission in this way has been planned all along; the news here is ...

Description: The twin GRAIL spacecraft are nearly out of fuel, and are being directed to a controlled impact near the north pole on the near side of the Moon on December 17. Before the end, though, they did some cool things, including flying within 2000 meters of mountaintops, and catching video of Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter in flight.

9. The end of GRAIL's mission

(Web Page; Thu Jan 10 17:40:00 CST 2019)

Thanks to Ian O'Neill for this (typically British) piece of black humour!

Description: I think they forgot to tell GRAIL what was about to happen to them...

10. Map of the Moon's crustal density inferred from GRAIL's gravity map

(Web Page; Thu Jan 10 17:40:00 CST 2019)

Data are presented in two Lambert azimuthal equal-area projections centered over the near (left) and far side (right) hemispheres, with each image covering 75 percent of the lunar surface.

Description: This graphic depicting the bulk density of the lunar highlands on the near and far sides of the moon was generated using gravity data from NASA's GRAIL mission and topography data from NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter. Red corresponds to higher than average densities and blue corresponds to lower than average densities. The average bulk density of the lunar highlands crust is 2,550 kilograms per meter cubed, which is 12 percent lower than generally assumed. White denotes regions that contain mare basalts (thin lines) and that were not analyzed. Solid circles correspond to prominent impact basins. The largest basin on the moon's far side hemisphere, the South Pole-Aitken basin, has a higher than average density that reflects its atypical iron-rich surface composition.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next