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A Tale of Two Posters: Sediment on Mars and Searching Jupiter's Rings

Mark Hilverda • December 12, 2013

A close look at two international planetary science poster presentations from the 2013 AGU Fall Meeting featuring sediment experiments to better understand Martian geomorphology and Juno's plans for exploring Jupiter's ring system.

Watch this with your kids: Asteroid Fact versus Fiction

Emily Lakdawalla • December 12, 2013

A cute video from the OSIRIS-REx mission in the style of "AsapSCIENCE" uses a whiteboard and stop-motion animation to separate asteroid fact from fiction.

The Plumes of Europa

Leigh Fletcher • December 12, 2013 • 12

2013 has been a rather exciting year for Europa scientists. Today's exciting news: the Hubble Space Telescope discovery of water vapor plumes from the south pole of this icy moon.

My Cosmos review will be delayed this week

Casey Dreier • December 11, 2013

A variety of AGU matters and unexpected political work and coverage will delay the Cosmos reviews by a week.

Enceladus huffs and puffs: plumes vary with orbital longitude

Emily Lakdawalla • December 11, 2013 • 2

In which I finally get around to writing about a paper published last August: Enceladus' plumes sometimes spout more and sometimes spout less, depending on where Enceladus is in its orbit. This discovery was enabled by Cassini's longevity at Saturn, and we'll be able to follow up on it, as long as Cassini is allowed to complete its mission.

Quick Chang'e 3 and Mars Orbiter Mission updates

Emily Lakdawalla • December 11, 2013 • 6

Yesterday Chang'e 3 lowered its orbit periapsis to a mere 15 kilometers, and Mars Orbiter Mission successfully performed a trajectory correction maneuver.

Top NASA Scientists Grapple with Budget Cuts

Casey Dreier • December 10, 2013 • 3

Ellen Stofan, NASA's Chief Scientist, and John Grunsfeld, the head of the Science Mission Directorate and a Hubble repair astronaut, highlighted recent NASA science discoveries at the American Geophysical Union conference in San Francisco.

Planetary Radio: Comet ISON, Rest in Pieces

Mat Kaplan • December 10, 2013 • 1

Karl Battams of NASA's Comet ISON Observing Campaign is our guest on this week's show. He explains how ISON really did become the comet of the century for scientists.

A Protected Class of Programs at NASA?

Casey Dreier • December 10, 2013 • 8

The House Science Committee is considering giving a select few NASA programs special protected status against cancellation.

Curiosity results at AGU: Gale crater rocks are old, but have been exposed recently

Emily Lakdawalla • December 09, 2013 • 4

In a Martian first, the Curiosity science team has measured the age of a Martian rock, in two totally different ways. They presented the result at the 2013 meeting of the American Geophysical Union.

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