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Our journalists and guest bloggers bring you stunning imagery and the space stories that matter most.

Report #1 from the New Horizons Science Team Meeting

Ted Stryk • January 19, 2010

The New Horizons science team is meeting this week. Ted Stryk was invited to attend the meeting, and he sent the following notes from the first day.

Two cool discoveries today: icy-hot exoplanet and smallest ever Kuiper Belt object

Emily Lakdawalla • December 16, 2009

There are two cool stories circulating today on the theme of discovering new places in the cosmos.

LPSC: Thursday: Rovers, Titan, Mars, Venus Express, Neptune

Ted Stryk • March 14, 2008

I spent a large portion of the day at the Lunar and Planetary Institute's library and presented my own poster during the poster sessions, so my coverage of Thursday's sessions is limited.

OPAG, Day 2: Ground-based study of the small bodies in the outer solar system

Emily Lakdawalla • May 07, 2006

After the political discussions of the morning, Mike Brown stood up to give the "highly subjective view of one ground-based astronomer," he said.

(Almost) everything you ever wanted to know about New Horizons and Pluto

Emily Lakdawalla • December 20, 2005

I was browsing around the Web today looking for material to improve the information we have on our site about Pluto, and discovered that the New Horizons mission has just posted their launch press kit.

An official pronouncement may be coming about the "what is a planet?" debate

Emily Lakdawalla • September 21, 2005

Since the discovery of 2003 UB313, larger than Pluto, there's been a lively debate going on in many places about what makes a planet. There's now an article in Nature talking about a proposal that would address the controversy

DPS: Updates on 2003 EL61 and 2005 FY9

Emily Lakdawalla • September 13, 2005

At a press briefing, the co-discoverers of the so-called "10th planet" 2003 UB313 gave an update on what is known about this and the other two scattered Kuiper Belt bodies that were announced at the time: 2003 EL61 and 2005 FY9.

Pluto: The Discovery of a Planet

Amir Alexander • February 18, 2005

To mark the 75th anniversary of the discovery of the planet Pluto, The Planetary Society presents to its readers the remarkable story of the discovery.

The Discovery of a Planet, Part 6: From Pluto to Sedna

Amir Alexander • February 17, 2005

74 years after Clyde Tombaugh discovered Pluto as a faint dot on a pair of photographic plates, a modern group of astronomers made another remarkable discovery. On March 15, 2004, Michael Brown of Caltech, Chad Trujillo of the Gemini Observatory, and David Rabinowitz of Yale announced the discovery of Sedna – the furthest object ever detected in the Solar System.

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