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How to design an effective scientific poster

Paul Byrne • October 05, 2018

In short, a poster should be as close to an infographic as possible.

#Mercury2018: From MESSENGER to BepiColombo and beyond

Emily Lakdawalla • May 17, 2018 • 5

A Mercury meeting held May 1-3 summarized the current and future science of the innermost planet. Emily Lakdawalla was there and shares her notes.

Recap: Breakthrough Discuss 2018

Jason Davis • April 18, 2018 • 5

If you had a spaceship and could take it anywhere in the solar system to search for life, where would you go?

#LPSC2018: Understanding early Mars through fluvial features

Adeene Denton • April 02, 2018 • 1

One of the ways we understand Mars' early climatic and geologic history is through preserved fluvial features.

#LPSC2018: Groovy Galilean satellites

Harriet Brettle • March 30, 2018 • 1

The Jovian system is a busy place. The Groovy Galilean Satellites session at last week's Lunar and Planetary Science Conference (LPSC) covered analysis of past mission data, testable hypotheses for future missions, and discussion of the use of ground-based data.

#LPSC2018: Fungi in the lab, hot springs frozen cold, and exploding lakes

Emily Lakdawalla • March 29, 2018

The first astrobiology session at last week's Lunar and Planetary Science Conference featured talks on a huge variety of interesting topics, and was one of my favorite sessions at the meeting.

#LPSC2018: Collaborative notes from conference sessions

Emily Lakdawalla • March 28, 2018

At last week's Lunar and Planetary Science Conference, I tried a new experiment: collaborating with other attendees to take a shared set of notes.

#LPSC2018: An Apollo 17 session with moonwalker Jack Schmitt

Megan Kelley • March 27, 2018

The only geoscientist to walk on the Moon attended a conference session presenting results from the rocks he collected.

#LPSC2018: Mars mass wasting in the laboratory

Jake Robins • March 26, 2018 • 5

Mars today is a dynamic place. One visually dramatic sign of change on Mars is "mass wasting," more commonly known as "stuff falling downhill". Scientists presented the results of recent laboratory work on Mars mass wasting at last week's Lunar and Planetary Science Conference.

#LPSC2018: Titan Is Terrific!

Emily Lakdawalla • March 21, 2018 • 1

Emily's first report from the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference is on the solar system's most atmospheriffic satellite, Saturn's moon Titan.

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