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Snapshots from Space

by Emily Lakdawalla

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Emily Lakdawalla

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Follow the thrilling adventures of planetary missions, past and present, and see the stunningly beautiful photos that they return from space!

New Horizons sees surface features on Pluto, begins raw image release

Emily Lakdawalla • April 29, 2015 • 11

Today the New Horizons team released a new animation of images taken on approach to Pluto. The animation clearly shows how Pluto wobbles around the Pluto-Charon barycenter. It also shows something more exciting to the scientists: variations in brightness across the surface of Pluto. They also began releasing raw images to the Internet.

New views of three worlds: Ceres, Pluto, and Charon

Emily Lakdawalla • April 16, 2015 • 7

New Horizons took its first color photo of Pluto and Charon, while Dawn obtained a 20-frame animation looking down on the north pole of a crescent Ceres.

What to expect when you're expecting a flyby: Planning your July around New Horizons' Pluto pictures

Emily Lakdawalla • March 10, 2015 • 18

As New Horizons approaches Pluto, when will the images get good? In this explainer, I tell you what images will be coming down from Pluto, when. Mark your calendars!

New Horizons spots Nix and Hydra circling Pluto and Charon

Emily Lakdawalla • February 18, 2015 • 4

A series of images just sent to Earth from New Horizons clearly shows Pluto's moons Nix and Hydra orbiting the Pluto-Charon binary.

New Horizons returns first images from mission's Pluto approach phase

Emily Lakdawalla • February 04, 2015 • 10

Here they are, the first images of Pluto from the approach phase of the New Horizons mission. Science has begun; we're on the home stretch!

Talking to Pluto is hard! Why it takes so long to get data back from New Horizons

Emily Lakdawalla • January 30, 2015 • 13

As I write this post, New Horizons is nearing the end of a weeklong optical navigation campaign. The last optical navigation images in the weeklong series will be taken tomorrow, but it will likely take two weeks or more for all the data to get to Earth. Two weeks! Why does it take so long?

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