Join Donate

Snapshots from Space

by Emily Lakdawalla

Author

Emily Lakdawalla

Date

All

Keyword

All

Follow the thrilling adventures of planetary missions, past and present, and see the stunningly beautiful photos that they return from space!

Browse Curiosity's data in the Analyst's notebook

Emily Lakdawalla • March 05, 2013

Last week the Curiosity mission made its first data delivery to the Planetary Data System. The bad news: none of the science camera image data is there yet. The good news: there are lots and lots of other goodies to explore.

Curiosity update, sol 193: drilled stuff is in the scoop, ready for analysis

Emily Lakdawalla • February 20, 2013

There was a press briefing today to announce that Curiosity has completed her last major first-time activity: powder drilled from inside a rock at John Klein successfully made its way into the CHIMRA sample handling mechanism in the turret. Sol 193, then, marks the day that Curiosity is finally ready to start the science mission.

A new rover self-portrait and a new color image of Curiosity from orbit

Emily Lakdawalla • February 04, 2013 • 7

Curiosity is inching her way through her first use of the drill on a Martian rock. She paused in the proceedings to capture a second Martian "selfie."

Columbia, ten years on

Emily Lakdawalla • February 01, 2013

Remembering Rick Husband, William McCool, Michael Anderson, Kalpana Chawla, David Brown, Laurel Clark, and Ilan Ramon on the tenth anniversary of the loss of the space shuttle Columbia.

One of my favorite space images of all time: Rosetta was here

Emily Lakdawalla • January 31, 2013 • 10

A conversation on Twitter today reminded me of this photo, which is one of my all-time favorite space images: the view from Rosetta during its Mars flyby.

Curiosity update, sol 171: Placing the drill

Emily Lakdawalla • January 29, 2013 • 1

They're getting closer and closer to drilling. Curiosity now seems to be positioned in the spot where they plan to be when they execute that long-awaited first drill.

"Sand" means something different to me than it does to you, probably

Emily Lakdawalla • January 24, 2013 • 2

I had one of those "A-ha" moments last week where I suddenly realized that I had run afoul of a common problem in science communication: when the words I'm using mean something different to me than they do to almost everyone I'm talking to. The confusing word of the week: "sand."

Pretty picture: new HiRISE view of Curiosity, sol 145

Emily Lakdawalla • January 16, 2013 • 2

Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter captured a new view of Curiosity on Mars on January 2 (sol 145). Curiosity was in the same location as the one from which it shot the sol 137 panorama I posted earlier. You can see the rover's tracks leading all the way back to the landing site!

Curiosity update, sol 157: Glenelg isn't just a test site anymore; it's a scientific "candy store"

Emily Lakdawalla • January 15, 2013 • 5

The Curiosity mission held a press briefing this morning for the first time since the American Geophysical Union meeting, and it was jam-packed with science. The biggest piece of news is this: it was worth it, scientifically, to go to Glenelg first, before heading to the mountain.

Planetary Society Weekly Hangout, Thu Jan 3 1200PT/2000UT: Jim Bell

Emily Lakdawalla • January 02, 2013 • 3

Join Emily Lakdawalla and Casey Dreier for a chat with Jim Bell, a scientist who wears many hats. He's the team lead for the Pancam color cameras on the Spirit and Opportunity rovers; he's a member of the Curiosity science team; and he's the esteemed President of the Planetary Society's Board of Directors. We'll talk about the great science being done by both Curiosity and Opportunity, and about what's in store for the future.

Items 31 - 40 of 40  Previous1234
Bill Nye and people
Let's Change the World

Become a member of The Planetary Society and together we will create the future of space exploration.

Join Today

Emily Lakdwalla
The Planetary Fund

Support enables our dedicated journalists to research deeply and bring you original space exploration articles.

Donate

You are here: