Join Donate

Snapshots from Space

by Emily Lakdawalla

Author

Emily Lakdawalla

Date

All

Keyword

All

Follow the thrilling adventures of planetary missions, past and present, and see the stunningly beautiful photos that they return from space!

First-ever high-resolution Synthetic Aperture Radar image of Enceladus

Emily Lakdawalla • December 01, 2011

On the November 6, 2011 flyby of Enceladus -- the third such flyby in just a few weeks -- the Cassini mission elected to take a SAR swath instead of using the optical instruments for once. So here it is: the first-ever SAR swath on Enceladus. In fact, the only other places we've ever done SAR imaging are Earth, the Moon, Venus, Iapetus, and Titan.

One-astronaut game of baseball in the International Space Station

Emily Lakdawalla • December 01, 2011

A fun video of Japanese astronaut Satoshi Furukawa playing baseball aboard the ISS.

At last, I've finished my scale solar system presentation slide/poster

Emily Lakdawalla • December 01, 2011

A presentation providing a correctly scaled, reasonably correctly colored view of the largest bodies in the solar system is made available for use by teachers, professors, and informal educators.

Reviews of space-themed books & products for young children

Emily Lakdawalla • November 30, 2011

As I do every year, I've collected a bunch of new (or relatively new) books and other products on space themes for children.

What's up in the solar system in December 2011

Emily Lakdawalla • November 29, 2011

What's going on with our planetary explorers in December?

Bye-bye, Curiosity

Emily Lakdawalla • November 29, 2011

A few fortunate (and forward-thinking) skywatchers looked upward in the hours after Curiosity's launch and were able to see the spacecraft leaving Earth.

The 70-meter dishes of the Deep Space Network

Emily Lakdawalla • November 28, 2011

I was inspired by my recent trip to Goldstone to put together this poster showing all three of the great 70-meter dishes of the Deep Space Network. There's one at each of the three complexes, at Goldstone, at Robledo (near Madrid, Spain), and at Tidbinbilla (near Canberra, Australia).

How did they make the nuclear power source for the Curiosity rover?

Emily Lakdawalla • November 28, 2011

Maybe it's because I was a kid during the Cold War; I always assume that information about anything nuclear only comes out on that "need-to-know basis."

Curiosity is on its way to Mars!

Emily Lakdawalla • November 26, 2011

It was a textbook launch for the Atlas V 541 today at 15:02 UTC, and within an hour after liftoff, the Centaur second stage had sent Curiosity on its way for an 8.5-month journey to Mars.

Mars Exploration Family Portrait

Emily Lakdawalla • November 23, 2011 • 1

Jason Davis put together this neat summary of the checkered history of Mars exploration.

Items 21 - 30 of 332  Previous12345678910Next
Bill Nye and people
Let's Change the World

Become a member of The Planetary Society and together we will create the future of space exploration.

Join Today

Emily Lakdwalla
The Planetary Fund

Support enables our dedicated journalists to research deeply and bring you original space exploration articles.

Donate

You are here: