Help Shape the Future of Space Exploration

Join The Planetary Society Now  arrow.png

Join our eNewsletter for updates & action alerts

    Please leave this field empty
Blogs

See other posts from February 2014

Headshot of Bruce Betts

Intro Astronomy Class 1: Tour of the Solar System

Posted by Bruce Betts

2014/02/11 05:53 CST

Topics: Enceladus, Titan, Saturn's moons, Saturn, Saturn's rings, Jupiter's moons, Jupiter's rings, Io, Europa, Pluto, Ganymede, Eris, Callisto, Venus, Earth, the Moon, Mars, Phobos, Deimos, Jupiter, Mercury, the Sun, near-Earth asteroids, trans-neptunian objects, comets, Earth impact hazard, asteroids, Triton, Neptune, Neptune's moons, explaining science, impact cratering, Uranus, Uranus' moons

In my first class of my Introduction to Planetary Science and Astronomy class at California State University Dominguez Hills, I took students on a tour of the solar system.  Come fly with me in the video below.  For more information about the class, see my class page, http://planetary.org/bettsclass

After some introductory information about the class, we started at the Sun, then moved out through the solar system, with overviews of Mercury, Venus, the Earth Moon system, Mars, near Earth asteroids and the asteroid belt, the Jupiter system including its large Galilean satellites, the Saturn system including its rings and moons, the Uranian system, the Neptunian system, trans Neptunian objects includign Pluto and Eris, and comets.  For each, I tried to orient students to the sizes involved, particularly relative sizes and distances. I also gave overviews of the exploration history of each body and started discussion of some of the key solar system processes that have shaped worlds, such as impact cratering.

Intro Astronomy 2014. Class 1: Tour of the Solar System

Take a tour of the Solar System in class 1 of Dr. Bruce Betts' 2014 online Introductory Planetary Science and Astronomy course at California State University Dominguez Hills.

In the next class, I will talk about how we explore space including the electromagnetic spectrum and telescopes, as well as some easy things you can see in the night sky.

 

Or read more blog entries about: Enceladus, Titan, Saturn's moons, Saturn, Saturn's rings, Jupiter's moons, Jupiter's rings, Io, Europa, Pluto, Ganymede, Eris, Callisto, Venus, Earth, the Moon, Mars, Phobos, Deimos, Jupiter, Mercury, the Sun, near-Earth asteroids, trans-neptunian objects, comets, Earth impact hazard, asteroids, Triton, Neptune, Neptune's moons, explaining science, impact cratering, Uranus, Uranus' moons

Comments:

John Wayne Tingley: 02/11/2014 06:43 CST

does this count towards credit hours?

Leave a Comment:

You must be logged in to submit a comment. Log in now.
Facebook Twitter Email RSS AddThis

Blog Search

JOIN THE
PLANETARY SOCIETY

Our Curiosity Knows No Bounds!

Become a member of The Planetary Society and together we will create the future of space exploration.

Join Us

Featured Images

Curiosity at Mount Remarkable from the ground and from orbit, sol 601

Unusual paper-thin erosion of a rock seen by Curiosity, sol 601
Navcam panorama of Mount Remarkable at the Kimberley, including planned drill location, sol 606
Navcam view of the proposed Curiosity Kimberley drill location, sol 609
More Images

Featured Video

View Larger »

Fly to an Asteroid!

Travel to Bennu on the OSIRIS-REx spacecraft!

Send your name

Join the New Millennium Committee

Let’s invent the future together!

Become a Member

Connect With Us

Facebook! Twitter! Google+ and more…
Continue the conversation with our online community!