Join Donate

Blog Archive

 

Pretty picture: Jupiter photo from an unusual source

Emily Lakdawalla • December 26, 2012

A recently launched Earth-observing satellite is using the stars to practice its pointing, and caught a neat animation of Jupiter.

Pretty picture: Landsat view of southern Greenland

Björn Jónsson • November 13, 2012

This is a very large (19000 pixels square) mosaic of the fjords and glaciers of southern Greenland. I had been interested for a long time in experimenting with the processing of Earth satellite imagery just to get a comparison to the other planets.

Hurricane Sandy: Thanks for lives saved already

Emily Lakdawalla • October 29, 2012

Today hurricane Sandy is a major threat to life and property across the west coast of the northern Atlantic ocean. I just want to give thanks in advance to all the people who have devoted their careers to making sure that Americans have sufficient warning of devastating, unstoppable weather events like this one.

NPP Earth observatory launched successfully, and I was there!

Emily Lakdawalla • October 28, 2011

Well, that was awesome. The NPP Earth observation satellite launched successfully an hour or so ago, and I was with a chilled but thrilled crowd of a few hundred people to watch it at Vandenberg Air Force Base.

NPP Tweetup schedule and launch timeline

Emily Lakdawalla • October 26, 2011

This evening I'll be headed up to Lompoc, California, to participate in my first Tweetup along with 25 other Tweeters.

NPP's launching next week, and I'll be there to see it! (Hopefully.)

Emily Lakdawalla • October 21, 2011

I'm (hopefully) headed to the launch of a Delta II (the last currently scheduled Delta II!) at Vandenberg Air Force Base, as one of only 20 people selected to participate out of more than 600 who registered.

Heads up! ROSAT is coming down this week

Emily Lakdawalla • October 17, 2011

It should give you a feeling of déjà vu: a defunct satellite's orbit is decaying, and because that orbit is circular it's going to be impossible to predict where and when along its ground track it's going to happen.

Earth observing satellites record large Arctic ozone loss

Jason Davis • October 14, 2011

Data from Earth observing satellites Aura and CALIPSO have shown record losses of seasonal ozone in the Arctic.

Finally, an official statement on UARS' exact reentry time and location

Emily Lakdawalla • September 27, 2011

The world watched on Friday as the derelict spacecraft named UARS made its final few orbits around Earth. And then we waited for final word of its reentry location. And waited. And waited.

Earth science's next big thing

Jason Davis • September 22, 2011

Meet the next big thing in NASA's mission to study planet Earth: NPP, the NPOESS Preparatory Project satellite.

Keeping track of UARS' reentry

Emily Lakdawalla • September 21, 2011

Unless you've been living under a rock you've probably heard that a very large Earth-orbiting satellite is going to be reentering Earth's atmosphere soon, and there's a small but nonzero chance of debris coming down where somebody might actually find it.

Congratulations to Russia on the launch of Spektr-R (RadioAstron)

Louis D. Friedman • July 18, 2011

Good news from Russia today: after 20 years of development they have finally launched their RadioAstron satellite (the official name is Spektr-R) into a high elliptical orbit around Earth.

India's launch site as seen by Japan's Daichi orbiter, now lost

Emily Lakdawalla • April 25, 2011

I wrote the following blog entry about an image from Japan's Daichi Earth-observing orbiter last week as one to keep in my back pocket for a day when I was too busy to write, not anticipating that there'd soon be a more pressing reason to write about Daichi. On April 21, after just over five years of orbital operations, Daichi unexpectedly fell silent, and is probably lost forever.

Glory Lost - But Its Mission Must Go On

Charlene Anderson • March 04, 2011

Another painful loss to NASA's mission to study Earth from space: Today a Taurus XL rocket failed to lift the Glory satellite into Earth orbit when its clam-shell nosecone refused to open, forcing the rocket and its payload into the southern Pacific Ocean.

Radar topographic view of a volcano

Emily Lakdawalla • January 17, 2011

Quick -- where is this? Is it one of Venus' iconic volcanoes? Or maybe Mars'?

Saturn's hexagon is not unique

Emily Lakdawalla • June 29, 2010

It turns out that Saturn's not the only place that displays geometrical shapes in its atmosphere. Earth does too.

A Martian Moment in Time, revisited

Emily Lakdawalla • May 12, 2010

A good start to my day today: The New York Times' Lens Blog featured the "Martian Moment in Time" photo that Opportunity took last week in a really nice writeup. I'm so grateful, and still a little surprised, that the folks on the Mars Exploration Rover mission took this idea and ran with it!

What's your favorite planet?

Charlene Anderson • March 02, 2010

Before you answer, check out these images!

Copenhagen Needs More Space, Part 2 The Orbiting Carbon Observatory Must Fly Again

Charlene Anderson • December 13, 2009

In our continuing saga of the Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO), the scene now switches from Copenhagen to Washington, D.C.

Copenhagen Needs More Space - Space Science Has Critical Role to Play in Climate Science

Charlene Anderson • December 10, 2009

Climate change and Copenhagen are dominating the world news this week, as politicians, diplomats, scientists, and protesters gathered in the Danish city for the 2009 meeting for the U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change.

Items 21 - 40 of 41  Previous123Next
astronaut on Phobos
Let's Change the World

Become a member of The Planetary Society and together we will create the future of space exploration.

Join Today

LightSail
LightSail

LightSail 2 will launch aboard the SpaceX Falcon Heavy. Be part of this epic point in space exploration history!

Donate

You are here: