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Blogs

Blog Archive

 

NPP's launching next week, and I'll be there to see it! (Hopefully.)

Posted by Emily Lakdawalla on 2011/10/21 05:39 CDT

I'm (hopefully) headed to the launch of a Delta II (the last currently scheduled Delta II!) at Vandenberg Air Force Base, as one of only 20 people selected to participate out of more than 600 who registered.

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Heads up! ROSAT is coming down this week

Posted by Emily Lakdawalla on 2011/10/17 07:44 CDT

It should give you a feeling of déjà vu: a defunct satellite's orbit is decaying, and because that orbit is circular it's going to be impossible to predict where and when along its ground track it's going to happen.

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Earth observing satellites record large Arctic ozone loss

Posted by Jason Davis on 2011/10/14 06:31 CDT

Data from Earth observing satellites Aura and CALIPSO have shown record losses of seasonal ozone in the Arctic.

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Finally, an official statement on UARS' exact reentry time and location

Posted by Emily Lakdawalla on 2011/09/27 12:25 CDT

The world watched on Friday as the derelict spacecraft named UARS made its final few orbits around Earth. And then we waited for final word of its reentry location. And waited. And waited.

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Earth science's next big thing

Posted by Jason Davis on 2011/09/22 11:27 CDT

Meet the next big thing in NASA's mission to study planet Earth: NPP, the NPOESS Preparatory Project satellite.

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Keeping track of UARS' reentry

Posted by Emily Lakdawalla on 2011/09/21 01:40 CDT

Unless you've been living under a rock you've probably heard that a very large Earth-orbiting satellite is going to be reentering Earth's atmosphere soon, and there's a small but nonzero chance of debris coming down where somebody might actually find it.

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Congratulations to Russia on the launch of Spektr-R (RadioAstron)

Posted by Louis D. Friedman on 2011/07/18 02:08 CDT

Good news from Russia today: after 20 years of development they have finally launched their RadioAstron satellite (the official name is Spektr-R) into a high elliptical orbit around Earth.

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India's launch site as seen by Japan's Daichi orbiter, now lost

Posted by Emily Lakdawalla on 2011/04/25 12:22 CDT

I wrote the following blog entry about an image from Japan's Daichi Earth-observing orbiter last week as one to keep in my back pocket for a day when I was too busy to write, not anticipating that there'd soon be a more pressing reason to write about Daichi. On April 21, after just over five years of orbital operations, Daichi unexpectedly fell silent, and is probably lost forever.

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Glory Lost - But Its Mission Must Go On

Posted by Charlene Anderson on 2011/03/04 01:16 CST

Another painful loss to NASA's mission to study Earth from space: Today a Taurus XL rocket failed to lift the Glory satellite into Earth orbit when its clam-shell nosecone refused to open, forcing the rocket and its payload into the southern Pacific Ocean.

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Radar topographic view of a volcano

Posted by Emily Lakdawalla on 2011/01/17 12:20 CST

Quick -- where is this? Is it one of Venus' iconic volcanoes? Or maybe Mars'?

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Saturn's hexagon is not unique

Posted by Emily Lakdawalla on 2010/06/29 11:49 CDT

It turns out that Saturn's not the only place that displays geometrical shapes in its atmosphere. Earth does too.

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A Martian Moment in Time, revisited

Posted by Emily Lakdawalla on 2010/05/12 02:30 CDT

A good start to my day today: The New York Times' Lens Blog featured the "Martian Moment in Time" photo that Opportunity took last week in a really nice writeup. I'm so grateful, and still a little surprised, that the folks on the Mars Exploration Rover mission took this idea and ran with it!

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What's your favorite planet?

Posted by Charlene Anderson on 2010/03/02 03:04 CST

Before you answer, check out these images!

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Copenhagen Needs More Space, Part 2 The Orbiting Carbon Observatory Must Fly Again

Posted by Charlene Anderson on 2009/12/13 02:41 CST

In our continuing saga of the Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO), the scene now switches from Copenhagen to Washington, D.C.

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Copenhagen Needs More Space - Space Science Has Critical Role to Play in Climate Science

Posted by Charlene Anderson on 2009/12/10 04:53 CST

Climate change and Copenhagen are dominating the world news this week, as politicians, diplomats, scientists, and protesters gathered in the Danish city for the 2009 meeting for the U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change.

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Another day, another natural disaster on Earth seen from space...

Posted by Emily Lakdawalla on 2005/09/29 08:14 CDT

...but this one is much closer to home than Katrina and Rita were.

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